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A Fisherman's Place - 1 Jan 2021

Co-Evolution of Boat and Man

How Fishing Vessels Have Shaped our Lives

Africa's Greatest Series Launching Soon


The design of fishing vessels varied from region to region before the standardisation in the 1950s; traditional vessels were made up of wood and ultimately went obsolete due to the high maintenance costs and short lifespans associated with them. Of course safer and more durable materials are now being used in the production of fishing vessels. In this article, Pescaluna dives deep into the evolution of vessels - we also introduce our own vessels which help us catch some of the highest quality fish around. Pescaluna is a pioneer of fresh fish in Cape Town and we deliver fresh fish straight to your door from our dock in Hout Bay.

Walk the Plank

 

Some of the earliest recordings of fishing vessels included rafts, dugout canoes, and boats constructed from tree bark, logs and stone, with the oldest boat belonging to the Neolithic Period (7000 to 9000 years ago). These vessels had minimal durability, rather they had floating capabilities, and were mainly used for fishing and hunting, and were not employed for long-distance travels.

Around 4000 B.C. the first multi-oarsmen vessels were developed by Egyptians. These vessels were long and narrow in stature, were built faster and larger than their predecessors and were suitable for long-distance travel. Simultaneously other countries also started developing innovative vessels for fishing and trade, like the Dutch, who in the 15th century, developed a drifter that became the blueprint for later developed European fishing boats, and the dogger boat, a 17th-century British invention, capable of carrying tonnes of fish at a time.

The Emergence of Steam Power

After years of further developing vessels, the trawler was finally designed in the 19th century, in Brixham, England. These vessels were built by modifying the dogger and their innovation dubbed Brixham the ‘Mother of Deep-Sea Fisheries’. This was a groundbreaking invention which empowered fishing and severely influenced the design of vessels around the world.

The trawler was later modified with the advent of steam; revolutionary vessels were built that ran with steam and were made up of steel hulls, which resulted in the stern trawlers and electronically aided commercial fishing vessels that we use today.

During the industrial revolution, steam engines impacted society greatly and made it possible to seamlessly work, live, market, specialise, produce, and viably expand without having to worry about the less abundant presence of waterways. Cities and towns were built around factories, where steam engines served as the foundation for the livelihood of many of the citizens.

The development of fishing vessels ultimately goes on hand in hand with the advancement of technology.

Walk the Line

 

Since the excavations of the Neolithic Period, the evolution of vessels has come a long way. Commercial fishing vessels (or Industrial fishing vessels) are vessels which are used for catching fresh fish and other seafood (generally from wild fisheries) for commercial profit. They are responsible for availing large quantities of food for countries around the globe, and thanks to the evolution of vessels, fishermen can now access deeper parts of the ocean with the help of deep-sea fishing vessels.

Let’s take a look at trawlers and non-trawling vessels.


Trawlers 

Trawlers are one of the common forms of fishing vessels employed and can be subdivided into two categories; Stern and Cutter. As the name suggests, trawler vessels have trawler nets that are suspended into deep waters to trap and haul fish. Trawler vessels catch a wide array of fresh fish (among other aquatic ecosystems) and although it is not a sustainable method of fishing (it can destroy seabeds and endanger fish species), it is still largely practised throughout the world.

Trawler vessels are equipped with automation and a refrigeration system (which maintains the optimum temperature for the caught fish). Some advanced, modern

trawlers have built-in, custom fish processing facilities on the vessel, which directs the fish to market as they reach the port.

Let’s look at more sustainable, non-trawling vessels.

Non-Trawling Vessels

Non-trawling vessels are highly effective fishing vessels with nets that are suspended into the ocean. These nets do not ‘scoop’ fish, nor do they move against the ocean’s current, they rather float in the water until fish swim to the net and get themselves caught.

Non-trawling vessels are subdivided into some of the following categories:

● Seiners

This non-trawling vessel is used to catch pelagic species; species of fish which are found near the water surface. Seine nets, equipped with traps that close the nets from below when the fish shoal enters it, are used in this vessel. These nets, at first glance, resemble huge floating devices and are effective in trapping fish that swim into it.

These fishing vessels are generally equipped with state-of-the-art technology and gadgets.

Longliners

Next up we have longliners. These vessels are equipped with multiple long fishing lines which are connected with hundreds of baited hooks. Automated systems help the vessel stay in place and spool the fishes to be consequently stored.

Interestingly enough, it’s the number of crew members, size of the ship and the automation facilities that determine the number of fishing lines to be provided on the vessel.

● Tuna Clippers

Next up we have longliners. These vessels are equipped with multiple long fishing lines which are connected with hundreds of baited hooks. Automated systems help the vessel stay in place and spool the fishes to be consequently stored. 

Interestingly enough, it’s the number of crew members, size of the ship and the automation facilities that determine the number of fishing lines to be provided on the vessel.

Crabbers

Crabbers are Fishing boats that are mainly and extensively utilised to fish for crabs and are alternatively referred to as ‘fish trap’ boats. They are equipped with custom entrapping aids to catch crustaceans.

● Drifters

Drifters refer to fishing vessels that make use of special drift fishing nets to haul and trap fish. These nets fall like long curtains into the ocean.

Fisheries all over the world utilise a variety of these vessels when catching fresh fish and seafood.

What’s really fascinating is the distribution of motorised fleets on a global scale:

● Asia is a major stakeholder - about 80% of the world’s vessels are owned by Asia (that’s roughly 2.2 million vessels).

● Africa comes in second with 153000 vessels.

● Europe has more motorized fleets than any other sort of vessel.

Let’s take a look at some of Pescaluna’s vessels which help us catch some of the finest quality fresh fish and seafood in Cape Town. We deliver fresh fish straight to your door from our dock in Hout Bay, covered in grease paper and brown wrap, which is just one of the many ways we ensure freshness and sustainability.



Pescaluna’s Vessels


Pescaluna promotes sustainability, not only when our vessels are in the water, but during our fish processing and delivery too. Our vessels are our pride and joy and are an extension of our tight-knit Pesca family.

Augusta 1

● Year Built: 1997;
● Year Augusta 1 Joined the Pescaluna Family:
2009
● Place Built:
Holland;
● Registered Length:
26.3m;
● Material of Hull:
Steel;
● Number of Crew:
26;
● Water Capacity:
18 000 L;
● Fuel Capacity:
36 000 L;
● Voyages:
The Augusta 1 is a longline fishing vessel which operates between the Orange River and Ponta Do Ouro (Mozambique’s coast).

 

Boloko 1

Previous Name: Disa;
Year Built: 1974;
Year Boloko 1 Joined the Pescaluna Family: 2000
Place Built: Durban;
Registered Length: 27.14m;
Material of Hull: Steel;
Number of Crew: 25;
Water Capacity: 18 000 L;
Fuel Capacity: 20 000 L;
Voyages: The Boloko 1 is a longline fishing vessel which operates between the Orange River and Ponta Do Ouro (Mozambique’s coast).

Olivia Marie

Previous Name: Fiona;
Year Built: 1973;
Year Boloko 1 Joined the Pescaluna Family: 2017
Place Built: Netherlands;
Registered Length: 30.77m;
Material of Hull: Steel;
Number of Crew: 25;
Water Capacity: 22 000 L;
Fuel Capacity: 41 000 L;
Voyages: The Olivia Marie is a longline fishing vessel which operates between the Orange River and Ponta Do Ouro (Mozambique’s coast).

Pescaluna’s Vessels

Pescaluna is a fresh fish pioneer in Cape Town and a proud member of SAHLLA. We are advocates for longline sustainability and continue to inspire people to love fish. Our vessels help us catch fresh fish in a sustainable manner.

Fishing vessels should meet the local and export demand of the nation and should be easily operable, but more importantly, should have no negligible impact on the environment. It is important for fishing vessels to be designed according to the standards and on the basis of sustainable development.

Totsiens


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